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About the Alliance for Inclusion and PreventionAbout the Alliance for Inclusion and Prevention

Results

Alliance for Inclusion and PreventionThe children and adolescents who come to AIP often face social or emotional challenges that they don’t know how to manage.  Many also are struggling with school.  We work with youth to help them better manage their feelings, their behavior, and their schoolwork.  By creating a safe, supportive environment designed to foster academic as well as social, emotional, and behavioral growth, AIP’s programs help children and youth to learn better ways to manage their emotions and actions and to make positive life choices.

Outcomes – By the Numbers
Our Students’ Progress: Stories
Notable Achievements

Outcomes – By the Numbers

Because school success is a significant indicator of a child’s emotional and social well-being and stability, we look at academic results for our students as well as at direct evidence of mental health, well-being, and improved behavior.  Academic success often is the only route out of poverty for low-income, urban youth, so this is especially important for our students over the long term.  Students dealing with complex problems typically show gradual improvements, with ups and downs along the way.  For Inclusion Day Program students, we track whether students are able to remain in a school setting that is equally or more mainstream.  Taken all together, our outcomes are promising.  Some examples: 

  • Student supports lead to student achievement:  39% of the 60 students in ASPIRE, AIP’s Frederick School therapeutic afterschool program, achieved School Honor Roll in 2007-08 School Year.  This is particularly notable because students are referred to the AIP afterschool program because they are having trouble in school.  (Source of data: Boston Public Schools)  In an independent study of outcomes for all students in both our afterschool programs (2003-2007), evaluators found positive gains in classroom behavior during the school day (n=309), in students’ initiative in school (n=310) and afterschool (n=357), and in engagement in learning (n=109).  (Source of data: SAYO  data from Boston Community Learning Centers)
  • Gains for the most troubled students:  In the Inclusion Day Program, we’ve succeeded when we keep children in the most normalized, real-world setting possible.  Typically, one third to one half of AIP students are able to transfer into at least one regular education class during the school year.  For example, in 2007-08 school year, 41% of our students achieved this benchmark. Approximately 30% of AIP students typically achieve full inclusion while in middle school.  80% of our 8th grade graduates went on to either mainstream or non-behavioral SPED placements.
  • Improved social and emotional health:  In its first two years of operation, 100% of students in AIP’s ASPIRE Therapeutic Afterschool Program at the Frederick School reported gains in self-esteem; 100% of their parents agreed.  (Source: AIP survey)  In an independent study of outcomes for all students in both our afterschool programs (2003-2007), independent evaluators for the city of Boston found positive gains in every measure (100%) of child well-being: children’s behavior while in the afterschool program (n=363), classroom behavior during the school day (n=309), and relationships with adults and peers (n=362).  (Source of data: SAYO  data from Boston Community Learning Centers)

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Report from the “Transition to Success Pilot Program,” 2000-2002, an independent study with comparison groups that validates and replicates the AIP Afterschool Program Model

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Our Students’ Progress: Stories

Student of the Month
“Niko” (not his real name) attended AIP’s Therapeutic Afterschool Program at the Washington Irving Middle School.  His Irving teacher referred him to the program in 6th grade because he was failing in school.  For Niko, the AIP program was the first time that he had spent any of his afterschool hours in learning-related activities.  While in the program, Niko made great strides in completing his homework consistently and in improving his understanding of math.  He also worked hard to learn to ask for help when he didn’t understand something.  At a monthly community meeting, his teachers announced that they had voted this shy boy, who had started the program because of limited academic achievement, as “6th Grade Student of the Month.”

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A Student Who Turned Her Grades Around
At the beginning of the school year, Shaunte (not her real name), an 8th grade student in the Frederick ASPIRE Afterschool Program, was failing in school.  At ASPIRE, she had a very hard time focusing during the daily homework hour.  Most days she would forget to bring her agenda book, would misplace her assignments, or would forget the directions that her teachers had given for her homework.  By the end of the year, after a series of customized interventions and months of structure, practice, and focus, Shaunte began to remember to document her assignments and complete them with minimal coaching.  In June 2008, Shaunte passed the eighth grade with no failing grades along with the rest of her class.

>> More Stories...

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AIP: Notable Achievements

  • Recognition of our effectiveness:  From 2000-2003, AIP at the Irving was selected as a demonstration site (the country’s only urban site) for the U.S. Dept. of Education/Eisenhower Foundation Full Service Community Schools Replication Project, created to disseminate nationally best practices in innovative student support partnerships.  Over 30 educators from around the country visited AIP over a 12-month period, to model their full-service schools after AIP’s Irving School program.  Also in 2003, AIP was tapped by the Governing Board of New Boston Pilot Middle School (now the Lilla G. Frederick Pilot Middle School) to serve as the full-service partner of this innovative new middle school in Boston’s most troubled neighborhood. 
  • Special Education Expertise:  Twice in recent years the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) featured the AIP program at its national conference as a national model for serving severely emotionally disturbed students by blending special education, prevention, and academics in a full-service school through Public/Private partnership. 
  • Community Leadership:  AIP is a founding member of the Boston Full-Service Schools Roundtable and sits on the Steering Committee of this citywide coalition.
  • Stewardship of the Public Trust:  AIP runs Boston’s oldest full-service school partnership, and it has maintained its innovative, sustainable funding model—building private dollars on top of a core municipal commitment—since 1995. 
  • Building Partnerships for Schools—Linking Schools and Students with Community Resources:  AIP nurtures partnerships between schools and many local nonprofit provider organizations, bringing dozens of partners into the schools to offer students an immensely broad array of opportunities, adult role models, and enrichment supports. 

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